Visual Support

Emotions Activities

Draw/Find the Other Half

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  • You can draw around a circle for the faces then draw on the different expressions.
  • Next, cover half of one side.
  • Encourage the person to draw on the other side of what the emotion looks like. It can be easier for an autistic person to mirror symmetry.
  • Label the emotions so that the person can relate the image to the word.

Another method is to make the activity more interactive by duplicating a copy of the image. Then use velcro so that the person can physically place the other half of the image onto the page.

Play-Doh Faces

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A fun way to help someone understand emotions is to make faces out of Play-Doh or putty.

A Traffic Light Wheel

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  • Draw a circle and section it into a third.
  • Draw on a happy face, neutral face and sad face.
  • Colour in the sections: happy = green. neural = yellow. sad = red.
  • Laminate then cut out the circle.
  • Draw an arrow, laminate and cut it out. (You can use card as an alternative).
  • Use a split fastener. Push it through the arrow and the centre of the circle.

Emotions Snap

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  • Draw out some facial expressions twice.
  • Label the emotions.
  • Laminate. An alternative option is to use card if you have no laminating pouches.
  • Cut out the emotions into a square shape.
  • Mix the cards up and play emotions snap.

Emotions Thermometer

  • Draw a thermometer and colour in the sections.
  • Label the sections with emotions. Remember to have the calm emotions at the bottom and the more extreme emotions towards the top.
  • Draw circles and fill in the facial expressions.
  • Glue down the thermometer onto paper. Label the emotions 1-5 at the side.
  • Cut out some Velcro and place under the numbers.
  • Cut out a small image of the person and velcro. An alternative is to use a general cartoon image from online.
  • Encourage the person to place their image next to the emotion of how they are feeling at the time.

The 8th Sense: Interoception

Body Mapping

When my son has a sensation, he does not necessarily link this to pain or feeling unwell. You can use a traffic light colour coding system to highlight the areas of your body that feel different. This is a great way to start off the process of linking that different feeling to being unwell.

Visual Support for Interoception

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For those who cannot recognise that sensation of needing to go to the toilet, you can incorporate this task as part of a bedtime routine.

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At sports time at school, you can create a small visual card to show an image of a drink next to the activity. This gives a visual prompt to drink water while playing sports.

Now and Next Boards

Click then print in landscape

Shuttleworth Checklist

Click then print in portrait

Alphabet Activity

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  • Print off the alphabet activity template
  • Laminate the sheets: another option is to print on card (your choice of colour)
  • Cut out the letters
  • Apply velcro onto the back of the letters and onto the grey boxes on the second sheet
  • Place the letters onto the grey squares, leaving a few empty squares.
  • Now you can play fill in the missing alphabet sequence

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  • You can also mix up the letters and encourage the person playing to sequence the letters in the correct order.

Alphabet Activity Template:

Click then print in landscape

All About Me Templates

Click then print in portrait